The Sounds of Silence

For those people (or just their RSS readers) who are subscribed/following this blog…

I just wanted to drop a quick note that I have not abandoned writing this blog.  I’ve got lot of ideas for future subjects, but I’ve been swamped at work and have not had the time necessary to put in the writing I like to do.

So in short, happy holidays.  I hope to get started writing again soon.

Take care,
Alain

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Stupid Citrix Tricks – 2

While there are a variety of products in the virtualization market place, Citrix has provided alerting and monitoring with Resource Manager since the early days of MetaFrame.   Despite moving over to EdgeSight and other tools in our environments, we still utilize RM for watching certain metrics and sending e-mail alerts on them.  Recently, I found a limitation with the Monitoring Profiles present in XenApp 4.5. 

We have a number of similar servers in our environment and a distinct monitoring profile for them.  As we added and built servers we added them to this profile.  What was unusual, is that if you right-clicked on the server in the AMC and selected set monitoring the correct profile would be selected.  However, if you went to the profile itself and listed the servers, it did not show all of them.

It appears that the monitoring profile is limited to only display 30 servers at a time.  To ensure that all servers are actually being monitored and reported on, I simply duplicated the monitoring profile and assigned the remaining servers to it.  It remains to be seen if we get more data/alerts as a result of this, but then again, I’m calling this series stupid Citrix tricks.

Thanks,
Alain

Stupid Citrix Tricks – 1

We are currently working on a project to move from published applications to published desktops.  With all the logistical issues and complications to make this experience as smooth as possible, one silly annoyance cropped up.  When you log into a Citrix desktop via ICA you may see this:

ICA Login to XenApp Server
ICA Login to XenApp Server

Typically, you don’t want to have your users see this because then the seemless desktop experience is a little tarnished.  There are a variety of ways to solve this problem, but the eaisest is to demonstrate your mad MSPaint skills.

On your XenApp system, look for ica256.bmp and ica.bmp under C:\Program Files\Citrix\System32.  All you have to do is open these files up and color them one solid color.  Once you do this, your users will see this:

ICA Login to XenApp Server modified
ICA Login to XenApp Server modified

Voilà, now your users hopefully won’t notice that something is different.  Of course, that Windows 2003 Login may be a dead give away.

Thanks,
Alain

A hard, rough, abrasive look at camel spotting…no dromedaries…no virtualization.

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